A glorious vista part one

On the evening of Easter Thursday, the blogger visited Mount Glorious for recreation. This ‘urban mountain’ forms part of the D’Aguilar National Park. Briefly, FM radio reception was tested in a street with an altitude of 767 metres above sea level. Those observations will be summarized in a forthcoming entry.

Panorama from Mt Glorious © 2006 Sherwin Huang

Panorama from Mt Glorious © 2006 Sherwin Huang

Observed at Mount Glorious’ Rainforest Circuit in the Maiala section of the park were rabbits, possums and a 15 centimetre wide brown frog.

Rainforest Path, Mt Glorious © 2011 Nick Bedford

Rainforest Path, Mt Glorious © 2011 Nick Bedford

To the east are spectacular views of the CBD and Samford village, particularly on Alex and Fahey Roads.

Rainbow, Mt Glorious © 2012 DamienQuick.com

Rainbow, Mt Glorious © 2012 DamienQuick.com

The residents of Mount Glorious can take full advantage of the view.

Mt Glorious © 2008 hacklock.net

Mt Glorious © 2008 hacklock.net

Mount Glorious is located on the border of the Esk, Pine Rivers and Brisbane local government municipalities. Bitumen road access is from Lake Wivenhoe, Samford or The Gap. Sealed access is not available from the north.

Summit of Mt Glorious © 2012 DamienQuick.com

Summit of Mt Glorious © 2012 DamienQuick.com

According to the Department of National Parks, Mount Glorious is home to longer walks including Greenes Falls and the Westside track. Only for the ‘hard core’, the Aquila loop is a six to 10 hour hike. It starts at Mount Glorious’ Maiala. Perhaps next time!

The Vines, Mt Glorious © 2010 Nick Bedford

The Vines, Mt Glorious © 2010 Nick Bedford

Rainforest canopy, Mt Glorious © 2013 Peter Ostergaard

Rainforest canopy, Mt Glorious © 2013 Peter Ostergaard

Like many city and regional areas, Mount Glorious was also affected by a notorious low pressure system back in January. On January 28th alone, 408 millimetres of rain fell. Here is an extract from the special report prepared by the Bureau of Meteorology:

Throughout its lifespan, [tropical low Oswald] brought heavy rainfall, especially in moist easterly
to northeasterly flow on its southern flank. The system was also associated with strong
winds, with numerous sites experiencing gusts in excess of 100 km/h, and coastal
storm surges and high waves, as well as a number of tornadoes, particularly in the
Bundaberg area.

Like all savvy bloggers, photographic artist Damien Quick took some extraordinary photographs and video footage which illustrate significant damage. Fortunately, few reminders of this ‘freak of nature’ are visible at Mount Glorious two months later.

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One Response to A glorious vista part one

  1. How are the leeches and ticks?

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