Permalogue television in the shire

Analogue television is fun, but the fun won’t last forever. With this in mind, this blogger dedicated a few hours observing 26 permanent & fringe analogue television broadcasts receivable at a three-storey dwelling in Russell Street, Noosaville between July 13-15, 2012.

Turning up to a ‘well-stocked fridge’

The receiving equipment supplied in the apartment was an AWA 37″ Full High Definition LCD television & a horizonally-polarized rooftop VHF/UHF antenna system, facing south-west. The rooftop antenna signals were amplified & split to supply seven apartments, as per the usual practice. It is noteworthy to mention that the master antenna system was substantially free of impurities – no Austar cable television stations were re-modulated onto vacant UHF channels. Nonetheless, Figure 7 illustrates the limitations of such systems.

Don’t argue with the ref (although tribunal sanctions are worse say Carlton fans!)

For reference purposes, a balcony-mounted, vertically-polarized 5-element NAS FM yagi antenna facing west (above) was used to compare signal strengths, including television receiver overloading, detailed in Figure 7. Figures 4 & 6 illustrate the obvious limitations of using a FM antenna for television signals, especially VHF high-band broadcasts 120 kilometres away.

How to read the tables without dozing off

The column marked ‘Receiving Antennas’ shows the performance of different signals with the two antennas. The column marked ‘Frequency’ merely contains the frequency provided on the television display, rather than the official nominal frequency of the vision carrier. As per convention, manual tuning was used to find very weak signals that the automatic scan feature of the television passed over.

Incomplete, because regional QLD has flicked off analogue

Please note that the Biggenden (Bundaberg/Hervey Bay/Tin Can Bay), Bunya (Kingaroy/Dalby/Crows Nest) & Briz 31 Mount Coot-tha analogue broadcasts closed in 2011. One can only speculate whether tropospheric scatter reception from these high-powered sites was possible. In any event, chances are good that these frequencies were blocked by local signals! For a history of analogue television broadcasting on the Sunshine Coast, please read this document.

Digital dalliances

Reception of digital television broadcasts (DVB) was possible from Bald Knob & the local Tewantin translator site only. Signal strength was good with 80% mean signal levels. The suite of digital frequencies and coverage areas are covered in this document. Reception of digital radio broadcasts (DAB) from Mount Coot-tha was not possible at this location, using either the rooftop VHF antenna or the balcony-mounted FM antenna (above). Tests of digital radio reception were not exhaustive. Probably only five minutes was spent on DAB using the automatic scan feature of the Bush DAB+ CD Micro System, model BMS-06DABIP. This blogger has previously established that the eastern beaches such as Sunshine Beach do indeed permit intermittent reception of digital radio, but a significant height above sea level seems mandatory. Fellow radio eccentrics report reception at relatively high altitude tourist vistas such as Noosa Hill & Laguna Lookout.

Frequency Station Picture
Quality
Receiving
Antennas
534.25 SBS Excellent Both
555.25 ABC Good-Excellent Both
576.25 7 SC Excellent Rooftop
VHF/UHF
618.25 SC
10
Perfect Both
639.25 WIN Perfect Both

Figure 1:Tewantin-Noosa translator site, situated 8 km away at an azimuth of 249°. The coverage area is towards the NW. This is the local broadcast site for the shire with an ERP of 2 kW.

Frequency Station Picture
Quality
Receiving
Antennas
625.25 SBS Poor Both
646.25 ABC Poor Both
667.25 SC
10
Poor Both
688.25 WIN Poor Both
751.25 7 SC Good-Poor Rooftop
VHF/UHF

Figure 2: Black Mtn broadcast site, situated 22 km away at an azimuth of 261°. The coverage area is towards the NW. This is the local broadcast site for Gympie with an ERP of 6 kW for the commercial stations & 20 kW for the public stations.

Frequency Station Picture
Quality
Receiving
Antennas
569.25 SBS Poor Both
611.25 ABC Poor Both
632.25 7 SC Poor Both
653.25 SC
10
Good-Poor Both
674.35 WIN Poor Both

Figure 3: Bald Knob broadcast site, situated 47 km away at an azimuth of 199°. The coverage area is towards the NE. This is the broadcast site for the Northern Sunshine Coast with an ERP of 60 kW.

Frequency Station Picture
Quality
Receiving
Antennas
695.25 BTQ
Seven
Very
Poor
Rooftop
VHF/UHF
730.25 TVQ Ten Very
Poor
Rooftop
VHF/UHF

Figure 4: Bald Knob broadcast site. The coverage area is towards the S. This is the broadcast site for the Southern Sunshine Coast with an ERP of 30 kW.

Frequency Station Picture
Quality
Receiving
Antennas
716.25 SBS Poor Both
737.25 ABC Good-Poor Both
758.25 7 SC Poor Rooftop
VHF/UHF
779.25 SC
10
Poor Rooftop
VHF/UHF
800.25 WIN Poor Both

Figure 5: Dulong Lookout translator site, situated 31 km away at an azimuth of 211°. The coverage area is towards the E. This is the local broadcast site for Nambour with an ERP of 20 kW.

Frequency Callsign Picture
Quality
Receiving Antennas
64.25 ABQ
Two
Very
Poor
Both
182.25 BTQ
Seven
Poor Rooftop
VHF/UHF
196.25 QTQ
Nine
Poor Rooftop
VHF/UHF
209.31 TVQ Ten Poor Rooftop
VHF/UHF

Figure 6: Mt Coot-tha broadcast site, situated 120 km away at an azimuth of 186°. The coverage area is omni-directional. This is the high powered broadcast site for the city with an ERP of 200 kW.

Frequency Image
of Station
Picture Quality Receiving Antennas
391.75 WIN Very
Poor
Rooftop
VHF/UHF
546.25 SBS Very
Poor
Rooftop
VHF/UHF
666.75 SC
10
Very
Poor
Rooftop
VHF/UHF
778.75 SC
10
Very
Poor
Rooftop
VHF/UHF

Figure 7: Images caused by distribution amplifier overload to rooftop
antenna.

Congratulations for making it this far! The reward is the final photograph, captured in glorious low resolution on a Nokia E51 cellular phone.



Next stop… is the FM band from the same receiving location featuring video footage.

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One Response to Permalogue television in the shire

  1. dbrmuz says:

    “Bald Knob”

    Lol!

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