Converting DVD audio clips

Connect the RCA cables from your tuner to the AV1-IN sockets of your DVD recorder. Select channel AV1 or similar when you make the video recording.

Rear AV inputs

Make the recording with your DVD recorder using XP mode. This mode seems to utilize the highest bitrate (256 kbps) AC3 audio on most DVD recorders. Record and edit your clips using a DVD-RAM, DVD-RW or DVD+RW disc. Note if +RW media are used only limited editing may be possible. Furthermore, with +RW media, the scope of editing possible (for example, dividing a title then deleting the unwanted portion) depends on your recorder. DVD-RAM is highly recommended if your DVD video recorder and computer drive support it.

Using a DVD-RAM with the LG 386D DVD Recorder

For simplicity, put only a single clip on each DVD. The file of the clip will be named something like VTS_01_1.vob or VR_MOVIE.vro on the DVD drive. The VTS prefix stands for Video Title Stream in case anyone cares!

It is convenient if you edit your clips using your DVD recorder using a feature called something like Delete Part or Trim. I think the interface is easier to use than doing so on a computer. However, we discuss computer-based editing in Option 2.1 if that’s what you prefer. By ‘editing’, I mean getting rid of the junk such as fadeouts and co-channel interference on the recording so your DX sounds as good as it can.

Editing clips with the LG 386D DVD Recorder

The options below require Windows XP operating system and a DVD drive that is compatible with the media you have chosen to use. If you don’t like Windows XP (for example, if you are using Windows 98 Second Edition or Linux) use the M Player method, described here to retrieve the audio. For me that method is actually quicker.

I want the original audio without any loss of quality. How do I get it?

Option 1.1 – AC3 MPEG stream

Download the open source software Virtual Dub Mod. Extract (demux) the AC3 stream from the VOB/VRO file (your clip). To do this, find the option Available Streams. Right click and ensure Direct Stream Copy is selected. Click on the Demux button.

Option 1.2 – WAV uncompressed audio conversion

Download the open source software Virtual Dub Mod. Convert the AC3 stream from the VOB/VRO file (your clip) to WAV format. To do this, find the option Available Streams. Right click and ensure Full Processing Mode is selected. Right click and ensure No Compression PCM is selected. Click on the Save Wave button.

Handling audio using Virtual Dub Mod

I want a lossy version of the original audio. How do I get it?

Option 2.1 – WAV conversion and editing

Use the resulting WAV file in conjunction with open source software such as Audacity to convert the audio to MP3, OGG, WAV or WMA format. Please aware that transcoding to lossy formats such as AAC, MP3, OGG or WMA may result in an audible loss of quality and/or increase in distortion regardless of the bitrate you choose.

You don’t have to use Audacity. The visual waveforms that the software produces are cool though! You can also Normalize and edit your audio if you haven’t done so using your DVD recorder (the recommended method).

The software that comes with your MP3 player such as Creative Media Source Audio Converter will also perform this conversion task, as will probably thousands of other free software programmes!

Option 2.2 – AC3 conversion

Use the resulting AC3 file from performing Option 1.1 in conjunction with free software AoA Audio Extractor Basic. This programme converts the AC3 audio to MP3, WAV or WMA format. Please aware that transcoding to lossy formats such as AAC, MP3, OGG or WMA may result in an audible loss of quality and/or increase in distortion regardless of the bitrate you choose.

Handling DVD conversions using AoA Audio Extractor Basic

Rear view photo by William Hook.

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One Response to Converting DVD audio clips

  1. anonymous says:

    Great info. The posting of ‘easy to interpret’ technical info encourages newcomers to this hobby. Thnx!

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